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What Happens Next As Eviction Moratorium Freeze Expires?

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Eviction notice document with gavel. Concept of financial hardship | What Happens Next As Eviction Moratorium Freeze Expires? | featured

The federal eviction moratorium expired Saturday, after a one-month extension ordered by President Joe Biden. What happens next to the millions of Americans who foregone paying the rent during the earlier pandemic?  

RELATED: What Every Person Facing Foreclosure Should Know

Federal Eviction Moratorium Expired July 31

The federal eviction moratorium managed to keep many Americans from forced evictions during a time when many lost their jobs. Last September, the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommended the freeze on evictions under the guise of preventing the spread of COVID-19.

It turned out to be the only working solution that kept millions of jobless tenants in their rented homes. However, the moratorium expired last Saturday, and landlords are now getting ready to collect what’s due them. 

Landlords pleaded with the court that they also have bills to pay. Unlike their tenants, however, they do not have access to $47 billion in federal aid that can help pay rents and other expenses.

Unfortunately, the distribution of federal rent aid is taking a lot of time. Advocates are calling for another extension until the funds reach the intended recipients. Otherwise, they said that renters should brace for evictions and lawsuits. 

3.6 Million Americans Face Evictions By August/September

According to the US Census Bureau, around 3.6 million Americans face eviction within the next two months. But more importantly, they will need to pay back missed payments in order to avoid eviction proceedings.

However, any missed payments might require paying landlords a late fee. This depends on existing agreements made between landlords and tenants. 

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With the eviction moratorium expired, tenants who are behind in their rent payments are now facing getting thrown out. Even with the moratorium in place, however, landlords can still evict tenants if the lease expires at any time.

It turns out that the moratorium only covers the nonpayment of rent. Other conditions such as lease expiration or breach of the agreement can still lead to evictions.

Some States Issued Legislation To Protect Tenants

In addition, legislation prohibiting landlords from charging late fees during the COVID-19 pandemic is available in some states only. Then, there are states who extended the moratorium on their own.

These are California, New York, New Jersey, New Mexico, Hawaii, Illinois, Maryland, Minnesota, Washington, and Washington DC. In addition, Nevada, New York, Massachusetts, and Oregon all have laws that will defer evictions for tenants with pending rent relief fund applications. 

If your state has neither eviction moratorium extensions nor deferments for relief applications, landlords can start the eviction process already. They can issue a notice of eviction beginning today. 

Why Didn’t The Federal Government Extend the Eviction Moratorium?

The Supreme Court voted to not end the eviction program and let it expire on July 31. Justice Brett Kavanaugh wrote the SC’s opinion that the monthlong extension is more than enough to collect rental assistance for Americans who applied.

After the SC’s decision, the White House cannot issue an order anymore to extend the freeze. Instead, Americans will need Congress to pass new legislation to extend it. They didn’t manage to do so.

Watch the KTNV Channel 13 Las Vegas video reporting that the federal eviction moratorium expired:

Do you support the expiration of the eviction moratorium, allowing landlords to evict nonpayers of rent?

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Do you agree with not extending the eviction moratorium, even as rental assistance funds have yet to reach renters?

Let us know what you think about evicting tenants on the basis of nonpayment of rent.

28 Comments

28 Comments

  • charles leightner says:

    We shouldn’t support grifters!

  • Mark says:

    There no perfect solution to this.
    There are a lot of tenants who taking advantage of the situation and just sitting around and getting assist ie simlius check, welfare there are jobs out there,it is unfortunately some have children I think we need to look at those issues closer some may not know how to apply for help

  • BBA says:

    At what point do we cut off the government tit and force people back to work off of their lazy asses?!? I see help wanted signs everywhere with signing bonuses to just start. I am so damned ashamed at how we are acting now as a society with people feeling entitled to bs pandemic money and not forced to pay their bills. For all of us who still act like Americans and pay our bills & taxes we cannot forever carry the burden of the handout leeches!

  • Walker Harris says:

    It’s time for the American people to take responsibility for their own actions. I fully believe that there is no room for people expecting a handout without attempting to better themselves. I started working paying jobs at 11 and had a bonded job at 12. Have never asked for anything for free. I have/ am raising five kids and we may have scraped by a few times, but they have never went hungry or unclothed. It can be done with the proper drive and motivation

  • Mark Hendricks says:

    The funny part here is the idea that the tenants are going to pay the amount owed for back rent. The government has been giving them money every month but told them they didn’t have to pay rent. Is anyone stupid enough to think they saved this money so that they can pay what they owe?
    These people will make the landlord spend the money to legally evict them and wait the 3-4 months it will take for the process to wind its way through the legal process. Then when they are evicted, they will just move to another rental unit.
    The landlord will be the one to continue to be screwed.

  • Tamara says:

    This is really bad in California. I’ma hard working single mother whom can’t find a unit within my budget because everyone has squatted and stayed. Evictions are still being held back here so who knows when the rental housing market will ever have more available units. Something needs to give because us working Americans who have the money to pay are getting the short end of the stick while the others have their bills on hold having a hay day with their Pandemic Assistance.

  • pete coffman says:

    These people probably recieved stimulous checks and went out and spent it on junk when they should have put it aside to pay for rents knowing they would have had to pay it eventually.

  • Nova Parsons says:

    I’m a landlord and I still had to pay the mortgage, taxes, insurance on the dwelling. If the ac/heating went out the tenets expected it to be repaired. No rent no fixing not all landlords are rolling in dough. The tenants received all this free money from the government they should have paid their rent. It’s time to evict the squatters.

  • Ali says:

    Being a landlord and coming from a tenant supportive state like Connecticut. I kept my property vacant. I would not even think to let someone come live in my home. The fact that most people were making more money at $600.00 or more a week and not paying rent! What a sham…Covid has paved the way for the Dems to gain more control of an already serious dilemma in our great country!

  • Demaris Miller says:

    Property owners are citizens with rights too. When renters become squatters, law enforcement should help get them out.

  • Mary says:

    It does not make sense to me where ur laid of work and receieving a little under 4000.00 a month and cant make rent or ur mortgage payment???

  • Michael Sunderland says:

    I am a landlord. I have been a landlord since 2008 and my family since 1963. I beleive in dealing with the problem versus FREE HANDOUTS. Many people needing “Rental Assistance” will get the money, move out eventually, and use the money for a new start somewhere else and leave the old landlord “on the hook” for past rent due.

    SOLUTION: Make rental assistance in the form of vouchers mailed directly to landlords of those “applying” for rental assitance. This would allow the family/person needing assitance to get thier rent paid but does not penalize the landlord.

  • pam mullins says:

    I think for most, it’s time to go to work. For the others, find government housing. I think a lot of people just sat back thinking this would never end. It’s time. The landlords are bearing the costs.

  • Lori024 says:

    Michael Sunderland… that is how it works. Anyone getting assistance has to name the landlord and provide their phone number and address. Payments go directly to the landlords.

  • Anonymous says:

    I’m sick of supporting lazy people. There are plenty of jobx available, and they’ve been sitting on their asses collecting “free” money for the last year and a half! Unfortunately for those of us actually paying for these worthless POS’s the money is “NOT SO FREE”, AS USUAL. Joe Biden and his big-spender administration can all go to hell!!! Quit wasting our money on freeloaders!!!! (and that includes you and your administration!!!!)

  • Chandall Webb says:

    There should definitely be an extension put in place. The funding is there. Our fellow American families need that assistance. The funds not reaching tenants yet is obviously not the tenants fault, unless they haven’t applied. Extend the moretorium. Let’s help our people. Yes jobs do need too be filled. But there are families and children that need a little extra help.

  • The Tennessee Way says:

    Get a Job! There are jobs every where. Owners can not find enough help. Get a job and the problem is solved!

  • larry losey says:

    most of these landlords are slum lords maybe they should fix the property up maybe people would be happy to pay the money

  • Kirby S says:

    I understand that land owners need to make money and live on the income from it. That is why they are in business. But at the same time there are possibly thousands that will be left with a place to stay. So it would be fair to both if renters could possible make large then normal payments, partial back payments along with there normal payment. It isn’t fair that both the landlord and the renter should suffer. If that isn’t acceptable to the landlords then both will suffer the in the end. Possibly no more back payments for the landlords and no place for the renters to go do to the lack of housing available to them. Try and work it out is the better way.

  • Jeanne A. Perry says:

    I never agreed w/tenants not having to pay their rent. There is never a hand out to landlords who still have a mortgage, insurance, taxes and up-keep to the property. They still have to pay to keep what is already theirs.

  • Bonnie Lambrecht says:

    If these people are getting unemployment there is no reason for them to have not paid their rent and yes for those people l vote for eviction.
    They are making $300 a week extra which makes $1200 plus unemployment check.

  • Indernayyar says:

    MORATORIUM IS NOT THE SOLUTION OF THE ISSUE THE PROBLEM IS ALSO MORE COMPLEX FEDERAL UNCONTROLLED ASSISTANCE MAKING THE WORKFORCE LAZY,COMFORT LOVING AS THEY DONOT INTEND TO WORK NOW
    GOVT MUST WITHDRAW ALL THE ASSISTANCES AND ONLY CARE FOR THE SUPER NEEDYS

  • Elaine says:

    Stop promoting welfare! If tenants could not afford the apartment they wouldn’t have moved in in the first place. The federal government has just been a nanny to irresponsible tenants and landlords have supported them for over 18 months under the Joe Biden regime!
    Stop promoting the welfare country right now Beijing Biden

  • Elhin says:

    Landlords w/be left holding the bag in the end. How many living for free off the LL for over a yr w/ pay what they owe they owe? Answer: NONE! Just another case of Socialism w/ all the inherenyptbflaws.

  • Erica says:

    First of all I would like to say that I actually have a great job. But a lot of places that are hiring have substandard pay on top of inflation from the early 2000’s up most people cannot afford to make it even week to week on what they would make working for these low wages. The system is broken. It only benefits the wealthy. Everyday Americans have suffered for years barely scraping by. I say billion dollar companies and corporations should be made to pay much higher wages and inflation of everything from food to bills should be brought down not to mention taxes on the poor. The Uber to h pay no taxes but get RI h off of the poor working hard for their corporations. Wake up the system needs an overhaul. And everyone should be able to see that

  • Anonymous says:

    Landlords, have been trying to reach agreement & work with tenant’s; But there are 59-70% of
    tenant’s who take advantage of this program.
    There are tenant’s who have not been affected by the pandemic due to a house hold of 2 & more that are 100% receiving income
    There need to be a verification of households income more focused on the truth of the real effected.

  • Anonymous says:

    What are tenant’s doing with the money that was sent to them from 3-6 types of Stimulus checks, unemployment checks, monthly disability check’s, funds that are being sent monthly for children of $300+. The money should be used for paying rent to provide a roof ‘ utilities for the children; instead of the parents buying , truck’s,cars,going on cruises & STREET NARCOTICS.

  • Philip says:

    It’s a fallacy that people that lost their jobs couldn’t afford to pay rent. Studies have shown that 70% of the unemployed were making more on unemployment than working (thus the current worker shortage).

    Additionally, the eviction process is going to take a long time. Normally it takes at least a month. With backlogs and courts opening slowly, it will take at least 3-6 months or more to evict someone.

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