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Microsoft’s First PC Set To Take A Bite Out Of Apple

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On Wednesday, Microsoft held an event in New York to showcase the future of the company. And it didn’t disappoint. By revealing the Surface Studio, Microsoft is focusing more on hardware than ever before. And with some subtle design points, the tech giant is looking to make the user experience a key piece of their winning formula. But will it be enough to win over Mac users?

What is New with Microsoft PC? Should Apple be Worried?

In the age old question of Mac vs PC, desktop users largely based their choices on operating systems. Recently, Microsoft Windows has ceded market share to Apple, with the iPhone maker now fourth in international market share at 7.4 percent of the market. Microsoft has taken note and is now manufacturing its first PC, the Surface Studio, to grab a foothold in the market. Can the Surface Studio deliver? It sure seems like it.

Microsoft’s design team seems to have taken some inspiration from the iMac. On the first impression, the Studio resembles a Mac quite a bit. Both desktops come as a “ready to go right out the box” system, with the processing and power components built into the base. But that’s where the similarities stop.

The design team was clearly focused on function over form.Microsoft created the Studio for creatives specifically. As such, the computer comes with a gorgeous and functional display, which is touted as having the “world’s thinnest LCD monitor ever built” at 12.5mm. It has an aluminum enclosure and measures 28 inches across. Microsoft describes the 13.5 million pixel display as “PixelSense – higher than 4k resolution”.

And like the other surface products, the studio is a touchscreen device – a feature Apple has not (yet) incorporated into its computers. The Studio’s Surface Pen gives a user 1,024 levels of pressure sensitivity, making the computer and stylus a very appealing option for creatives. The Studio also features a “zero gravity hinge”, meaning users can lower the monitor to a 20-degree angle for better leverage and viewing. There’s even a Surface dial accessory, which users place directly on the screen to scroll and summon tools and apps or customize images in real time.

Everything about the Surface Studio is incredibly appealing – except for the price tag. The standard model comes in at $2,999, going all the way up to $4,199 fully loaded. Clearly, the system isn’t meant for casual users but for offices and professionals. However, even with the hefty price tag and Microsoft already noting there will be limited supplies for Christmas, expect the Studio to be a trending gift for the holidays.

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Microsoft is looking to prove it’s a creative company. The Surface Studio is a big step in the right direction. Combined with Microsoft’s other announcements of a Windows 10 Creators Update with 3d Virtual Reality capabilities, Microsoft looks to be changing their direction from the Microsoft of old to a brand people not only trust but enjoy.

Check out this new All in One Surface Studio from Microsoft here:

The Studio is a precursor of what’s to come from Microsoft, and it’s a good one. Expect Microsoft Corporation (MSFT) to go up steadily over the next year as more products roll out.

Another merging is happening with Sunrun and LG. Find this news when you click here.

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